November 06, 2020

Humans Descended from Alien Mushrooms


Humans Descended from Alien Mushrooms
Where did humanity really come from? Image by Tony Wills via Wikimedia Commons

People often wonder where humanity came from. While most accept the Darwinian theory of evolution from primates, a journalist in Russia has put together research from foreign scientists that may suggest a different heritage.

According to Aleksander Galkin, a journalist at Ekho Moskvy, humans are actually descended from extraterrestrial fungi.

Galkin’s claim is not without foundation. About five years ago specialists in the UK found that the human genome includes DNA from several species of fungi. Moreover, Canadian researchers discovered a species of mushrooms that is over 600 million years old, suggesting it could have played a role in the evolution of primates. Galkin also notes that experts studying asteroids found traces of bacteria and fungi on them that are not present on Earth, yet are still able to survive in its conditions.

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