August 22, 2023

Get Another Search Engine


Get Another Search Engine
Google stall at an event in Cologne, Germany. Rajeshwar Bachu, Unsplash.

Moscow's Court District No. 422 has levied a three-million-ruble ($31,500) fine on Google following the company's refusal to take down specific content per requests of Russian authorities. At the same time, many Russian users are reporting issues when using the site.

Interfax and TASS correspondents reporting from the courtroom reveal that the fine pertains to a YouTube video discussing Russia’s War on Ukraine and providing instructions on accessing “protected facilities.” The videos in question, which focused on subjects such as "Ukrainian children" and "events in the Kherson region," were highlighted by a RIA Novosti correspondent who refrained from disclosing further details.

With this latest penalty, Google now faces its 28th fine under Article 13.41 of the Code of Administrative Offenses, a string of sanctions initiated since the spring of 2021. The surge of fines began against the backdrop of demonstrations supporting opposition leader Alexei Navalny, propelling Roskomnadzor to request the company to implement content filtering.

Connection issues have emerged among Russian users of the search engine, as indicated by data from GlobalCheck. According to Meduza, users in Russia must connect via a VPN in order to use Google. Reports of disruptions in Google's services have been submitted by hundreds of users all over Russia, such as Moscow,  St. Petersburg, Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg, and Nizhny Novgorod.

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