May 28, 2021

Congrats to Mikhail Kubar!


Congrats to Mikhail Kubar!
We'll gladly sit through a graduation if there's only one name to read. Yngaa_school, Instagram.

Living in a small town has its perks. For one, you get to be de facto valedictorian.

The village of Ynga in Yakutia graduated only one high-school senior, but simultaneously had a 100% graduation rate. Mikhail Kubar, the sole senior class member at the village school, was honored at a ceremony last week.

During the event, Kubar's first-grade teacher noted that he was also the only first-grader in her class. While at one time he had as many as four or five classmates, Kubar finished solo. Other school administrators noted with pride and humor that the entire eleventh grade had 100% attendance, 100% academic performance, and 100% participation in activities, which we certainly can't claim.

The ceremony was proudly posted to Instagram and has since made the rounds on some Russian media channels.

Mikhail, if you're reading this, a big поздравляем from all of us at Russian Life!

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