May 15, 2023

Bribing Orphans to Fight


Bribing Orphans to Fight

The governor of the Primorsky Krai (in Russia's Far East), Oleg Kozhemyako, has proposed offering orphans housing in exchange for joining Russia's War on Ukraine. The initiative was announced by the speaker of the regional assembly, Alexander Rolik, in his Telegram channel.

Kozhemyako has submitted a draft law to the assembly that would prioritize the provision of housing to orphans who have fought in Russia's War. The law would not require orphans to attain the age of 23, nor evaluate whether they are ready for independent living.

The draft law will be considered at the next session of the Primorsky assembly. Rolik said the chamber would fast track the law and, in his words, support for those fighting in Ukraine is, for the powers that be in Primorye, "a top priority."

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