March 15, 2020

5-Hour Phone Film


5-Hour Phone Film
Check out the new 5-hour film about the Hermitage! Image by kuhnmi via Flickr

Apple recently completed its first project in Russia that wasn’t an adaptation of an international project: a five-hour film on the Hermitage. What makes this project especially unique is how it was filmed: all in one take on an iPhone 11 Pro Max. In the film, viewers take a walk through the museum, including 45 halls and around 600 different works of art.

According to the film's director, Aksinya Gog, the film is an attempt to capture one day in the life of the museum. For her, it was important to highlight the connection between art, which exists outside of time, and modern life and technology.

The film features several characters, such as a boy lost in the museum, an older couple, and other art lovers examining the exhibits. It also includes dance performances. However, there are no spoken words and arguably the film has no plot. Gog said hers is one of few films that viewers can watch small clips of and still get the impression of the whole thing.

So if you don’t have five hours to watch the video (which can be accessed on Apple’s Russia YouTube page), feel free to browse through various clips to get the full impression from this mighty and unique film!

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