May 12, 2022

Ukraine's Best Friend


Ukraine's Best Friend
Heroes come in all sizes. Twitter, @ReciteSocial

A bomb-sniffing Jack Russell terrier named Patron has become the latest famous defender of Ukraine.

At only two years old and tipping the scales at just 15 pounds, Patron is protecting Ukraine with help from his owner/handler Mykhailo Iliev, a member of the Civil Protection Service. The diminutive soldier works with the State Emergency Service in Chernihiv – seeking out explosives, teaching children about safety, and acting as an unofficial emotional support dog for children.  

Patron became internet famous for helping his owner diffuse approximately 90 bombs in March. The Centre for Strategic Communications StratCom Ukraine celebrated Patron with a video on Twitter, chronicling Patron performing his duties. He was even nicknamed the “mascot of Chernihiv.” The pup also gets loads of props from the public through fan arts and crafts.

Also in March, at a ceremony in Kyiv, Patron received official recognition from Ukrainian President Zelenskyy for finding over 200 bombs and explosives since the start of the invasion.

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