February 12, 2020

Statistics Highlight Vodka Hotspots



Statistics Highlight Vodka Hotspots
All that's missing are pickles and sala. Dan Ox via Flickr

A recent survey by the Research Center for the Federal and Regional Alcohol Markets has pinpointed the top five regions for alcohol consumption in the Russian Federation. Just in time for awards season.

The number-one vodka-drinking region? Sakhalin, where the average person consumes 12 liters of the stuff annually. Close on their heels is Magadan with 11.4 liters, followed by Komi (10.6), Chukotka (10), and Karelia (9.6).

The geographically-minded might notice something similar among all these regions: they're fairly northerly, and therefore, according to experts, traditionally prefer strong alcoholic drinks. And, to demonstrate the laws of economics, vodka appears to be most expensive in places where it's most in demand.

To put this in context: the average American consumes 2.34 gallons of alcohol annually, or about 8.9 liters. Keep in mind that's all types of alcohol: Americans trend towards beer and wine. The 12 liters per capita consumed yearly in Sakhalin are only vodka.

Completely unrelated: American life expectancy is 78.6 years, compared to Russia's 71.6.

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