July 16, 2021

Not Cu-Cumbersome for Prisoners



Not Cu-Cumbersome for Prisoners
Cool as two cucumbers. Photo by Kelly Neil on Unsplash

On July 8, the Russian online news outlet “Orlegrad” reported that a penal colony in the Kromskoy district of the Oryol region has taken an approach to convict rehabilitation that requires its prisoners to develop a green thumb.

Since April, prisoners have been tasked with tending to different types of cucumber. The colony has a greenhouse with an area of 500 square meters where residents plant seedlings, engage in microclimate regulation, air, water, feed, process, shape, and harvest their vegetables.

The gardening not only helps diversify the diets of prisoners and create additional jobs and earnings, but the labor is also thought to help them “embark on the path of correction.” The first harvest came in mid-June, and prisoners have since gathered 575 kilograms (about 1270 pounds) of four cucumber varieties.

While it is yet to be seen how successful this activity will be in nudging inmates back to the high road, we can hope this cucumber solution will take no prisoners.

 

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