December 14, 2020

More Dead Souls


More Dead Souls
Rostec. Employees: 14 less than you'd think. Ivtorov, Wikimedia Commons

Life reflects Gogol, too often.

An executive at one of Russia's largest high-tech firms, Rostec, is under house arrest following a legal scandal.

Alla Laletina, director for legal support and corporate governance, has lost her position after it was discovered that fourteen of her employees didn't exist. Instead, she collected salaries from the nonexistent workers at Novosibirsk Artificial Fiber Plant JSC, which manufactures military equipment.

The total amount in salaries collected totals more than R5 million ($68,500), and the scheme reportedly included other beneficiaries, as well.

At least they were employees, and not serfs (or students).

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Some of Our Books

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Murder and the Muse

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Davai! The Russians and Their Vodka

Davai! The Russians and Their Vodka

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Jews in Service to the Tsar

Jews in Service to the Tsar

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The Pet Hawk of the House of Abbas

The Pet Hawk of the House of Abbas

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Russia Rules

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Woe From Wit (bilingual)

Woe From Wit (bilingual)

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Life Stories: Original Fiction By Russian Authors

Life Stories: Original Fiction By Russian Authors

The Life Stories collection is a nice introduction to contemporary Russian fiction: many of the 19 authors featured here have won major Russian literary prizes and/or become bestsellers. These are life-affirming stories of love, family, hope, rebirth, mystery and imagination, masterfully translated by some of the best Russian-English translators working today. The selections reassert the power of Russian literature to affect readers of all cultures in profound and lasting ways. Best of all, 100% of the profits from the sale of this book are going to benefit Russian hospice—not-for-profit care for fellow human beings who are nearing the end of their own life stories.
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93 Untranslatable Russian Words

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Maria's War: A Soldier's Autobiography

Maria's War: A Soldier's Autobiography

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Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
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The Latchkey Murders

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