January 15, 2020

Jogs Good, Like Camel Should



Jogs Good, Like Camel Should
Perhaps he's training for a marathon. Pikabu.ru, Juv4ik1988

A camel in southern Russia caused rail delays after running on the track in front of a train.

Presumably eager to start the New Year off on the right hoof, the Astrakhan Oblast camel chose to route his jog onto a rail line, forcing the driver of an approaching train to slow to camel-jogging speed (22 kph). Despite several blasts from the train's horn, the animal was unperturbed, and maintained its consistent and nonchalant pace before slowing to 13 kph, likely due to fatigue. Fortunately, the camel left the tracks before deciding to bed down in front of the train.

Railway authorities commented that the incident carried "the potential risk of injuring passengers and locomotive crew workers." They conspicuously omitted concern for the camel.

The good news: if a camel can work to keep up his keep-in-shape for 2020 resolution today, despite a few man-made obstacles (humps?), so can you.

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