March 17, 2021

It Happens to All of Us


It Happens to All of Us

“Well f*** your mother, they positioned it like a monkey!”

– Meduza reported on March 11 that the Crimean Minister of Culture Arina Novoselskaya did not realize she had turned on her microphone during a video call with other Crimean leaders. Head of Crimea Sergey Aksenov interrupted her swearing. He demanded that Aksenova calm herself, and then directed the Vice Premier of the region Mikhail Nazarov to conduct an investigation into the matter. Aksenova begged forgiveness from her colleagues as many as five times; her setup had, apparently, gone offline ("у меня машина отключилась."). The meeting progressed as normal.

 

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