June 27, 2022

Forbidden Fruit


Forbidden Fruit
Juicy? Yes. Poisoned? Maybe.  Pexels, R Khalil

Russian forces in Melitopol, Ukraine, have become ill after eating poisoned cherries they stole from farmers.

The mayor of Melitopol, Ivan Fedorov, reported that the cherries were intentionally poisoned with chemicals as a “gift” from locals to the Russian troops who have been occupying the city for months. He also stated that the “mass disease” caused by the cherries is a form of resistance, demonstrating that the troops should not steal from his people.

Last month, it was reported that troops stole the local cherry harvest with false promises to pay for them, after earning a large profit by exporting them to Crimea.

Melitopol is a major producer of cherries for Ukraine, as the city maintains over 2,000 hectares of farms growing the sweet delicacy. The region's resistance is sneaky but, hopefully, effective in preventing the kinds of looting and vandalism seen elsewhere.

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