May 04, 2022

An End in Sight?


An End in Sight?

“This offensive may end on the eve of May 9, because the [Russian] forces are running out, as are the existing reserves. As our Commander-in-Chief said, the occupiers have already brought the entire reserve into the territory of Ukraine, and then an operational pause will be required.”

– Ukrainian military expert Oleg Zhdanov

Military expert Oleg Zhdanov said he believes that the Russian offensive may soon come to an end. While not all of the information has been confirmed, he claims there is evidence suggesting an imminent withdrawal of Russian forces from Ukraine.

The Armed Forces of Ukraine have kept up a constant fire defensive that is preventing  Russian forces from strengthening their position. Zhdanov said that Russian forces may be able to maintain their offenses for a few days, but that their reserves will eventually be exhausted.

According to British intelligence, Russia has already deployed 65 percent of its troops, and that perhaps a quarter of them have already been incapacitated.

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