May 14, 2022

An Apologetic Putin?


An Apologetic Putin?
Putin speaks with the holy land despite his own proclivity to fascism. Larry Koester

Since the start of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, President Vladimir Putin and his minions have repeatedly voiced the lie that Ukraine is full of Nazis.

When answering a question of how Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, who is Jewish, could be a Nazi, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said that Hitler had Jewish roots, then went on to claim that Jews were the most ardent anti-Semites.

Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett quickly responded that Lavrov was lying in order to blame Jews for being the victims of the crimes they had suffered from, attempting to relieve the perpetrators of their responsibility. Israeli Foreign Minister Yair Lapid shared similar sentiments and called the comments not only outrageous but inexcusable.

On May 1, Putin had a telephone conversation with Bennett. Afterward, Bennet reported that Putin apologized for Lavrov's statements. Kremlin reports on the meeting made no mention of the apology, and only stressed how important May 9, Victory in Europe Day, is to both Russia and Israel.

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