May 13, 2020

A New Role for Kioski?



A New Role for Kioski?
Old ladies sweeping sawdust need some help in keeping the metro safe and clean. The RussianLife files

In the face of the coronavirus pandemic, Moscow's metro is taking on the challenge of fighting the disease.

In addition to passcards, travelers can now pick up masks and gloves at metro ticket stalls. 

Subway passengers can protect themselves from coronavirus by purchasing these at any metro station, some with multiple locations, bringing the kiosk total to 966. Thousands of masks and gloves have been distributed in anticipation of the implementation of a rule on May 12 requiring masks on public transport.

Here's secretly hoping that this will encourage the rebirth of the once-ubiquitous kioski that once lined underground corridors and sold everything from hats to cameras to lingerie. It would be easy to add a couple more products to their lineup.

 

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