August 27, 2022

A Flag that Rocks


A Flag that Rocks
No shortage of patriotic fervor. RIA Novosti.

With Russia's Flag Day landing on August 22, one local governor pulled out all the stops.

The governor of Samara Oblast, Dmitri Azarov, organized the creation of a monumental Russian flag on a local hillside. The tricolor is 63 meters (206 feet) long and consists of 600 tons of stones painted white, blue, and red. The rocks required two and a half tons of paint.

Azarov got help from local youth organizations, who spearheaded the plan to lay out the stones. Overall, the project took two weeks to complete.

Along with the flag, the internationally infamous "V" and "Z" symbols were also created out of colored rocks as part of the monument, which is now an unabashed patriotic display for years to come.

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