June 17, 2008

Tokyo Declaration


Tokyo Declaration

May 5, 1986

1. We, the Heads of State or Government of seven major industrial nations and the representatives of the European Community, with roots deep in the civilizations of Europe and Asia, have seized the opportunity of our meeting at Tokyo to raise our sights not just to the rest of this century but into the next as well. We face the future with confidence and determination, sharing common principles and objectives and mindful of our strengths.

2. Our shared principles and objectives, reaffirmed at past Summits, are bearing fruit. Nations surrounding the Pacific are thriving dynamically through free exchange, building on their rich and varied heritages. The countries of Western Europe, the Community members in particular, are flourishing by raising their cooperation to new levels. The countries of North America, enriched by European and Asian cultures alike, are firm in their commitment to the realization in freedom of human potential. Throughout the world we see the powerful appeal of democracy and growing recognition that personal initiative, individual creativity and social justice are main sources of progress. More than ever we have all to join our energies in the search for a safer and healthier, more civilized and prosperous, free and peaceful world. We believe that close partnership of Japan, North America and Europe will make a significant contribution toward this end.

3. We reaffirm our common dedication to preserving and strengthening peace, and as part of that effort, to building a more stable and constructive relationship between East and West. Each of us is ready to engage in cooperation in fields of common interest. Within existing alliances, each of us is resolved to maintain a strong and credible defense that can protect freedom and deter aggression, while not threatening the security of others. We know that peace cannot be safeguarded by military strength alone. Each of us is committed to addressing EastWest differences through highlevel dialogue and negotiation. To that end, each of us supports balanced, substantial and verifiable reductions in the level of arms; measures to increase confidence and reduce the risks of conflicts; and the peaceful resolution of disputes. Recalling the agreement between the United States and the Soviet Union to accelerate work at Geneva, we appreciate the United States' negotiating efforts and call on the Soviet Union also to negotiate positively. In addition to these efforts, we shall work for improved respect for the rights of individuals throughout the world.

4. We proclaim our conviction that in today's world, characterized by ever increasing interdependence, our countries cannot enjoy lasting stability and prosperity without stability and prosperity in the developing world and without the cooperation among us which can achieve these aims. We pledge ourselves afresh to fight against hunger, disease and poverty, so that developing nations can also play a full part in building a common, bright future.

5. We owe it to future generations to pass on a healthy environment and a culture rich in both spiritual and material values. We are resolved to pursue effective international action to eliminate the abuse of drugs. We proclaim our commitment to work together for a world which respects human beings in the diversity of their talents, beliefs, cultures and traditions. In such a world based upon peace, freedom and democracy, the ideals of social justice can be realized and employment opportunities can be available for all. We must harness wisely the potential of science and technology, and enhance the benefits through cooperation and exchange. We have a solemn responsibility so to educate the next generation as to endow them with the creativity befitting the twenty-first century and to convey to them the value of living in freedom and dignity.

Source: U.S. Dept. of State

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