November 17, 2022

Still Aloft?


Still Aloft?
Neeeeeoooowwwww. The Russian Life files.

Rosaviatsia, Russia's government body overseeing aviation, has announced that it will conduct an inspection of 599 foreign-made airliners by the end of December. The undertaking will draw on both Russian airline staff and government inspectors.

The aircraft, mostly Airbus and Boeing passenger jets, will pass their regulatory inspection due date by the end of the year, and so will be in need of service. However, because Airbus and Boeing both left Russia at the start of the war in Ukraine and took technicians with them, Russian internal resources and manpower have to be mobilized to ensure the jets stay flying.

Rosaviatsia also said that anyone that doubts the ability of the ministry and Russian industry to oversee the maintenance is probably invested in seeing the Russian aviation industry become dependent on Western companies. (We are sure that this statement is unbiased and not politically motivated at all.)

Ironically, some Russians are opting to still use the jets, just without the whole take-off part.

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