February 28, 2022

Reaffirming Ukrainian Sovereignty


Reaffirming Ukrainian Sovereignty
Vladimir Zelensky standing in front of a map of Ukraine as he addresses Putin's actions. Screenshot of Zelensky's speech.

On February 21 Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a document recognizing the "independence" of the Donetsk and Luhansk People's Republics, both of which are part of Ukraine. After Putin's announcement, representatives of the Ukrainian National Security and Defense council urgently convened to discuss Russia's actions. After the meeting, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky gave a televised speech.

Zelensky recognized Putin's actions as Russia's unilateral withdrawal from The Minsk Agreements and that not only did it signify their withdrawal, but also that, by signing the document, they were violating the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine.

Zelensky went on to remind listeners that, according to Article 51 of the UN, Ukraine reserves the right to collective and individual defense of its borders.

You can watch Zelensky's stirring speech here.

Russia invaded Ukraine four days later, on February 24, 2022.

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