January 04, 2024

My Fair Snow Maiden


My Fair Snow Maiden
1988 Soviet postage stamp depicting the two protagonists of "Well, Just You Wait!" Wikimedia Commons

Controversy arose after a recent New Year's celebration at a school in Nakhodka, a port city in Russia's Far East Primorsky Krai region.

According to local news outlets City N and Vladivostok Online, a male physical education teacher played the role of the Wolf dressed as the Snow Maiden, a humorous character from the Soviet cartoon “Well, Just You Wait!” (“Nu, Pogodi!”), during the school's holiday celebration. Following the event, some Nakhodka residents lodged complaints about the teacher's participation.

One comment from a resident of Nakhodka read: "I ask the prosecutor's office to pay attention to the celebration in School 26 of the Livadia village. What family values can we talk about if the overgrown Snow Maiden is played by a guy? The children came in shock... Please take action – the Ministry of Education of Primorye does not react, the Ministry of Culture, too. I'm waiting for an official response for further appeal.” News outlet “City N” notes that there were no complaints about the girl who dressed up as Santa Claus.

The school administration released a statement, explaining their traditions and apologizing: “Teachers and children on this day come in carnival costumes, New Year's music happens during all breaks, competitions and New Year's lottery are held, Santa Claus's workshops occur. Teachers and children always wait for this day because they know it will be a lot of fun! 

"Teachers dressed in costumes performed plots of Soviet cartoons. Our favorite cartoon 'Well, Just You Wait!' was no exception. The role of the Wolf in the Snow Maiden costume was performed by our physical education teacher, who congratulated the kids on the holiday. There was no limit to the joy, fun and delight of children!

"We did not pursue any subtext or malicious intent in the plot with the heroes of the event. Our only goal is to please, amuse children, and embellish our school life.”

According to Vladivostok Online, many Primorye residents defended the school, recalling their own primary school teachers dressed as characters like Koshchei or Santa Claus during their childhood celebrations.

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