September 20, 2021

Holier Hockey


Holier Hockey
Who says priests can't have a little fun?  Photo by Samantha Gades via Unsplash

Priest Alexander Dubasov from Yekaterinburg has always loved hockey and saw no reason that his participation in the sport should be affected once he undertook his religious vows. He's continuing his job as a referee, even as he's taken on a holier vocation.

Dubasov played the sport throughout his youth and a little bit in adulthood but decided to become a referee once he became older in order to still stay in the game. However, he wasn't always interested in becoming a priest; for a while, he ran his own business but found that unsatisfying, so at fifty years old he entered the priesthood.

Nowadays he continues to referee but finds that his presence has inspired a holier quality to the matches he judges: the players watch their language a little more closely and they avoid fighting. Dubasov even said that players will approach him before and after matches for spiritual advice. If only all Russian priests took up such wholesome hobbies. 

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