February 23, 2020

Better Policy for Children? No Kidding.


Better Policy for Children? No Kidding.
New playgrounds in Russia’s Arctic capital will take into account the opinions of children. Nord-news.ru

Five Russian oblasts have schooled the rest in good socio-economic policy, according to recent awards from the Expert Institute of Social Research. Even though the contest was wide open thematically, it turned out that all of the top five initiatives had something to do with education and children. 

Ulyanovskaya Oblast started a contest for “class leaders” – like American homeroom teachers – and started paying them all more too, putting greater value on a type of whole-person teaching that previously was seen by many as an administrative function.

In Magadanskaya Oblast, they also put their money where their mouth is and made it easier for mothers to access funds to support babies. Once those babies are grown-up university students no longer supported (directly) by their mothers, they will find financial backing in Magadanskaya Oblast, which raised student stipends to the level of minimum wage.

Yaroslavskaya Oblast improved children’s hospitals, and Murmanskaya Oblast improved their playgrounds – by listening to the opinions of the children themselves.

Here’s hoping other regions of Russia learn from these ideas and are inspired to do their own homework to improve the lives of students and children. 

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