March 29, 2021

Who's Not Done With Quarantine?



Who's Not Done With Quarantine?
Lavrov in his Covid finest. Screenshot from the Tiktok account of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Russia’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergei Lavrov traveled to China this week for a working visit and was caught with his mask up.

Lavrov was filmed in Guilin County wearing a mask he had received from a group of journalists the day before. The inscription on the mask reads “FCKNG QRNTN.” We'll let you fill in the rest.

Russian journalists have vocalized appreciation for the Minister’s sense of fashion. Journalist Dmitry Kiselev wrote on Telegram: “Sergei Lavrov is just a handsome man!”

He also reminded readers that Lavrov is the “minister of the country that is certainly controlling Covid better than the West,” sent greetings to those who thought they knew better than Russia, praised Sputnik V, and recommended that no one “suffer because of the police, who stroke you with clubs and water cannons.”

The video of Lavrov was posted to the Tiktok account of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In the video, Lavrov is standing on the deck of a boat gliding past mountains and tall willowy trees.

There might be worse ways to spend this FCKNG QRNTN.

 

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