August 05, 2020

The West's Holodomor Unmasker



The West's Holodomor Unmasker
Gareth Jones has a very important, if less well-known, legacy. Screen capture of "Mr. Jones" trailer via YouTube

A street in Ukraine’s capitol of Kyiv is being renamed “Gareth Jones Lane” to honor a British journalist who helped expose the debilitating and deathly famine in Soviet Ukraine in the 1930s.

Gareth Jones was a Welsh journalist who was the first to bring the Soviet Famine in Ukraine, now known as the Holodomor, to the attention of Western audiences. While the Holodomor is still shrouded in misinformation, it is known that more than four million Ukrainians died during this time, which is believed to have been instigated by Stalin as a form of genocide against Ukrainians.

Jones was one of few journalists able to bring news of the famine to the rest of the world. He went to Moscow in 1933 and took a train to Ukraine, getting off close to the border and continuing on foot. His first-hand view of Ukraine and its struggles became the basis of his reports to the rest of the world.

Jones’ work is coming even more into the mainstream now, beyond having a street named after him, with the release of a new movie, Mr. Jones. The film follows Jones’ trek through Ukraine and his resulting struggle to convince the rest of the world, including some prominent journalists, such as Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times bureau chief Walter Duranty, that the Holodomor was, in fact, real and an act of genocide. Mr. Jones was released in the US in spring 2020.

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