January 15, 2021

The Fast and the Broomiest



The Fast and the Broomiest
Beep beep or sweep sweep? User Sidik iz PTU, Wikimedia Commons

We're all guilty of multi-tasking, but street-sweeping and bus-driving are two activities that ought to stay separate.

That didn't stop a bus driver in the Russian enclave of Kaliningrad, who is under investigation by local authorities after trying to do just that, after a video on Russian social media site VK appeared showing them changing gears with what seems to be a mop handle.

The video's caption reads: "Even though I'm an atheist, I rode and prayed that the clutch would not break down."

While some internet denizens have praised the drivers' resourcefulness, others are less enthusiastic. Local police began an investigation a mere ten minutes after the clip was posted.

Then again, anyone that has ridden a bus in Russia knows that a broom handle being used to change gears is probably the least of your worries.

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