July 14, 2020

The Dream Passenger (according to Russian Flight Attendants)



The Dream Passenger (according to Russian Flight Attendants)
Passengers can be great, or they can be... difficult. Image by rigoneumann via Needpix.com

In Russia, July 12 was flight attendant day. In honor of that event, OneTwoTrip conducted a survey of Russian flight attendants to see how they would describe their dream passenger.

According to the survey, the ideal traveler is polite, calm, and sleeping. Moreover, perfect flyers are friendly, love to smile, and have a sense of responsibility. Finally, they prefer passengers who are understanding and quiet.

Earlier in the month, a Reddit appeared that compiled flight attendant comments on the unpleasant things customers do. A common complaint was passengers leaving trash and other discarded items in inappropriate places. “Diapers, food, vomit, plastic bags. All this is stuffed into any slot, small pockets on the backs of seats, and under the seats,” one commenter said. Another complained that “People in general often do disgusting things on folding tables: I saw how they changed diapers on them, cut their toenails, and this is only a small piece of it.”

Tags: aviation
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