February 20, 2020

#TBT Mir Space Station Launched


#TBT Mir Space Station Launched

Thirty-four years ago today, the Mir Space Station was launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome. Mir had a long and impressive history, setting the stage for the ISS. Mir was deorbited in March 2001 (here's why and how).

Mir hosted more than 23,000 scientific experiments, resulted in more than 78 spacewalks for a total time of 359 hours and 12 minutes, and was home to Sergei Krikalev for a record 463 days (unexpectedly longer than planned due to the end of the USSR during his stay).

Mir from Space
Mir as seen from space. / NASA

 

Tags: spacemir

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