December 13, 2020

Pay with your Face


Pay with your Face
Yes, the Moscow Metro is great, but we at least want to operate under the illusion that our every move isn't being tracked. The RussianLife files

Every day, we move close to an Orwellian cyberpunk dystopia. The Moscow Metro, perhaps fittingly, is taking the next step.

The city's Deputy Mayor for Transport, Maxim Liksutov, announced last week that Face ID will become an option for Metro passengers next year.

The upgrade will take advantage of existing cameras near turnstiles – which can already recognize faces – and connect with biometric data that banks already have on file. If passengers have such data tied to a bank account, they will automatically be charged, saving them the trouble of swiping a fare card or dropping in change.

According to Liksutov, the software can even recognize masked faces. Not even COVID can stop the algorithm overlords.

 

 

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