January 24, 2020

Panda Becomes Moscow Grinch



Panda Becomes Moscow Grinch
Definitely not pining for more of the holiday season. Telekanal 360 | Youtube

Yolki palki!”, Russians will say when something goes accidentally wrong, meaning “pine trees branches.”

Well, a panda in the Moscow zoo literally turned a pine tree into a pile of branches, and it was anything but an accident. More like an attack.

Perhaps the panda was supporting the third of Russians who say they can’t bear the holiday season any longer? Or maybe she just wanted to tell the people who gave her the tree as a New Year’s gift what she really thought of their attempt to replace her bamboo, apples and carrots? Or she also could have been excited about the first snow of the year.

The emotions of pandas are not so black and white, but the way Russians interpreted it definitely says something about their own inner post-holiday Grinch – and it’s not even Chinese New Year yet. 

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