February 27, 2022

Our Top Sources for Ukraine News


Our Top Sources for Ukraine News
It's a confusing world out there. The Russian Life files

Ever since Russia invaded Ukraine this past week, we've been trying to keep tabs on the situation. After all, many of us have friends and family on either side, and we're hungry for information and updates. However, there's a lot of rumors and misinformation out there, and good sources are hard to find.

Here are our go-to spots.

Russian sources: Generally, we'd encourage our readers not to trust much of the Russian-language media. Journalistic censorship has seen a massive spike in the last few days, and anything not Putin-friendly simply will not appear. This applies especially to the major news organizations that are typically reliable: Izvestia is calling the military operation the "defense of Donbass," and Vesti.ru dubbed Ukrainian president Vladimir Zelensky the "President of War" and Biden's February 24 response "anti-Russian hysteria." Add to this the fact that many Russian government websites are down, and you'll be hard-pressed to find reliable info, especially stuff that isn't unbiased.

That said, we've been pleased with UkrainianWall.com, which provides Russian-language reports on what's happening.

Ukrainian sources: These are much more reliable than Russian sources, but should still be taken with a grain of salt. These are much more on-the-ground, since they're providing up-to-date news for Ukrainians.

Facty.ua ("Facts")

Vesti.ua ("Guide")

Ukrainskaya Pravda ("Ukrainian Truth")

English-language sources: We're assuming that you have some level of understanding of general Russian geopolitics, as we've found many Western sources to be too general. The below websites are both reliable and detailed.

CNN's live updates usually focus on international political and economic concerns, but are useful regardless, condensed into a scrollable feed.

Radio Free Europe is a pro-democracy and anti-war stalwart, and, although sometimes their articles get a little opinionated, their photographic and journalistic coverage from a human rights perspective is invaluable.

The Moscow Times is the major English-language paper in Moscow and is popular with expats. Their coverage has been remarkably balanced, and their live feed has covered multiple fascinating details.

We here at Russian Life will be keeping an eye on the situation with our signature penchant for the offbeat, but for constant updates, the above, we hope, will be helpful.

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