August 02, 2021

Leaving the Mark of Marriage at the Altar



Leaving the Mark of Marriage at the Altar
One day of the year that you might consider a marriage stamp a good thing Skye Studios on Unsplash

The Russian Federation has made it optional for Russian citizens to include an indication of their marriage status or parenthood in their passports. This change came about on July 22 along with several others that give individuals greater control over their personal identification.

Disgruntled, Yekaterina Laxova of the Union of Russian Women announced on the Telegram channel "Radiotochka NSN" on July 23 that she found the decision “incomprehensible... I believe that stamps about marriage and children are important."

Laxova said her concern is that the family be both strengthened and developed in Russia, and she views a designation in the passport – the most important document for a Russian citizen – as reinforcement of these values.

Citizens of Russia can also request that their blood group, rhesus blood factor, and taxpayer identification number be included in their passports. However, the documents will still include records of when a person registers and leaves a place of residence, as well as information about the military service obligation of citizens who have reached the age of 18.

While some may welcome the possibility to unlink their identity from their marriage status, Russia’s Saint Fevronia, patron of Family, Love, and Fidelity might wag her finger just as vigorously as Yekaterina Laxova likely would…

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