February 02, 2020

Joke about God Drives Comedian to God's Homeland



Joke about God Drives Comedian to God's Homeland
How to change your life, according to an expert on situational irony. Aleksandr Dolgopolov | Youtube

A Russian comedian is live from Israel to tell you “how to lose everything in one day and change your life in a dramatic way.”

His solution is simple: think up a nice repressive Russian law, publish a Youtube video that violates it, and flee the country.

Alexander Dolgopolov himself accomplished this by making a joke about Jesus, and then, fearing prosecution for a law against “offending the feelings of believers,” fled to… Jesus’ homeland, as the most popular comment on his stand-up routine points out. However, he said he came to Israel on business – the business of not being arrested – not on a pilgrimage. Omg, talk about irony. (Or is “omg” offensive?)

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