August 21, 2020

I'm Not Dead Yet



I'm Not Dead Yet
No need to turn on the lights and siren, apparently. Zimin Vas, Wikimedia Commons

An elderly woman in the city of Kursk awoke after surgery not in a comfortable hospital bed, surrounded by friends and family, but in the hospital's morgue.

The woman was reportedly admitted to the hospital with abdominal pain. Doctors operated on her, but she did not respond to resuscitation and was declared dead after more than half an hour.

The next morning, a (we presume very startled) hospital employee found her awake in the morgue. The patient is now back under medical surveillance.

The regional health committee is now investigating the incident, declaring it "unacceptable." The hospital has defended itself by saying that it lacks expensive equipment to measure brain activity, and that the chief doctor was on vacation at the time.

Regardless, we think zombies, even elderly ones, are the last thing we need in 2020.

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Some of Our Books

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The Little Golden Calf

The Little Golden Calf

Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
The Samovar Murders

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The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

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The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
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Davai! The Russians and Their Vodka

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Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

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