February 09, 2020

Hell on Wheels



Hell on Wheels
The newest cause of road rage? The painting The Number of the Beast is 666 by William Blake | Wikipedia

The devil’s in the details when it comes to regulations.

Russian priests in Sverdlovsk Oblast are upset that they could start seeing local license plates numbered 666, a number often associated with the Devil.

License plate numbers in Russia are assigned by region, and previously only two digits were used, 96 and 66 for Sverdlovsk. The new law would give regions three digits, to allow for a greater number of combinations.

“Before coming out with some kind of initiative, you have to turn on your brain and consult, as proscribed in the scripture,” a representative of the regional church said, criticizing the officials that wrote the regulation.

It remains to be seen whether the Ministry of Internal Affairs will take the complaint into account and put the breaks on the new law. 

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