June 23, 2020

Even Russians Make Typos



Even Russians Make Typos
Ah, Russian language. I wish I knew how to quit you. Travelask.ru, RussianLife Files

Students at Tolyatti's School No. 2 have had their graduation plans put on hold.

Apparently, a printer error caused by a computer malfunction has led to many students' certificates from the past school year being declared void. Mistakes on the documents included misspellings of the word "socialist" ("социлистического" in place of "социалистического"), "foreign" ("иностранны," not "иностранный"), and the omission of the city name.

The school administration is scrambling to reprint the documents, as the errors make them inadmissible for university admissions.

For those of us who are language learners, it's a little comforting that sometimes even Russians miss a letter or two.

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