April 30, 2022

Deukrainianization


Deukrainianization
Khrabrovo airport in Kaliningrad, prior to its new paint job. MediaZone

Sandboxes, stadiums, airports, and fences: if it's blue and yellow, it must change. Russian authorities are repainting everything that could be visually associated with Ukraine.

The color changes began back in February, when, on the fourth day of the war, the Kaliningrad Khrabrovo airport changed its website logo from blue and yellow to red and blue. Not long after that, they repainted the logo on the airport's exterior. An airport spokesperson said that the change to the exterior logo was to keep the look cohesive.

A Yekaterinburg shopping center recently followed in Kaliningrad airport's footsteps. The shopping center roof, which was blue and yellow, has recently been removed. According to the center's call center, the paint was chipping anyway, and its removal was part of regular maintenance.

In Yakutsk, a stadium's very Ukrainian-looking seating is being ripped out. The speculation that this is due to its colors is incorrect, or so says the stadium head, who claims that there were only three rows of blue seats and plans to rip them out were created long ago.

It isn't only major businesses that are changing logos and paint jobs. A Pskov resident who traditionally paints her fence yellow and blue every year was forced to change it; sandboxes at a park in a town south of Moscow received complaints and were repainted green; and a woman who works for a translation agency in Yalta was asked to remove her nail polish due to their coloration.

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