December 28, 2020

Cussing Stats



Cussing Stats
Then again, why do you need swear words in Russian when so many phrases already sound like expletives if said loudly? The RussianLife file

Russian is a beautiful language that lends itself well to obscenities. However, some Russians don't use it to its full potential.

Russia's Public Opinion Foundation has released a new study that reveals how Russians think about swearing. Most revealing, 11% of participants say they cuss often, 61% rarely, and 26% apparently never stub their toe, as they never swear.

Further, 46% of those 60 and older oppose the use of foul language, while those in younger groups are more comfortable with bad words.

Those 31 to 45 are the most potty-mouthed, and tend to swear the most. Although, of course, some younger demographics can also get in on the action.

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