October 13, 2020

Cheburashka to Hit the Big Screen



Cheburashka to Hit the Big Screen
Soyuzmultfilm; YouTube user purplephoton

Cheburashka, the adorable Soviet stop-motion kid's cartoon, is set to be adapted for a full-length feature film.

Soyuzmultfilm, the company behind the original Cheburashka shorts from the 1960s, is taking the lead in the reboot, which is said to have a budget of R600 million (nearly $8 million). The film will be shot in 2021 and released the following year.

The 1960s short films, which concern the mysterious but cute Cheburashka, follow his adventures and friends, from Cheburashka's discovery in a crate of oranges, to Crocodile Gena's workday at the zoo (where he works as, of course, a crocodile). The shorts were, and still are, popular throughout the former USSR, and Cheburaska himself is a pop culture icon, although he is a "creature unknown to science."

We look forward to seeing Cheburashka's gritty origin story, revenge quest, and big-budget fight scenes in Cheburashka 2: Cheburashka's Return. While you wait, you can check out the originals that started it all.

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