October 13, 2021

Being the Face Sans Facebook



Being the Face Sans Facebook

“The president’s website is working. There are no problems.”

– Press Secretary for the President of Russia Dmitry Peskov

Go ahead and wipe the sweat from your brows, dear friends – not even Facebook can take down website of the President of the Russian Federation. On October 4, Peskov announced that all was well with the President's representation, at least, when an outage of Facebook’s servers also temporarily derailed affiliated applications, including WhatsApp and Instagram.

But for the Russian President’s website to avoid calamity during a Facebook outage?! Perhaps the Federation is closer to Internet independence than it seems…

 

 

 

 

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Every language has concepts, ideas, words and idioms that are nearly impossible to translate into another language. This book looks at nearly 100 such Russian words and offers paths to their understanding and translation by way of examples from literature and everyday life. Difficult to translate words and concepts are introduced with dictionary definitions, then elucidated with citations from literature, speech and prose, helping the student of Russian comprehend the word/concept in context.
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Woe From Wit (bilingual)

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