October 27, 2020

A Good Reason to Join the Military



A Good Reason to Join the Military
With cool outfits like these, why not join the army? The Russian Life files

A 17-year-old in Kursk has been lauded by local authorities for her efforts in distributing conscription notices to young men.

Anna Tselikova, a student, chose to help out the local military registration and enlistment office as a volunteer this fall. Her job has been to go door to door and hand out summonses to conscription-age men. Her efforts have led to the enlistment of some 30 recruits.

Her success has been attributed to the fact that 18-year-old guys are usually happy to open their door to a young woman. Only then does she hand a form from the enlistment office.

All of Tselikova's recruits have shown up for duty on time.

The young student will soon receive a certificate from the local authorities praising her for her work, which shows no sign of letting up. Good thing, too, since we need someone to participate in Russia's massive military parades.

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