100 Young Russians

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Dmitri Liss, conductor

Dmitri Liss, conductor

By Mikhail Ivanov

Russian National Orchestra founder and director Mikhail Pletnev had suffered a foot injury while hiking on the eve of the orchestra's first Hollywood Bowl concert. Associate director Dmitri Liss was tapped to fill Pletnev’s spot at the podium that first night — a daunting assignment no matter what your preparation.

Masha Mironova, actor

Masha Mironova, actor

By Mikhail Ivanov

There is a Russian saying that “Nature ignores the children of geniuses.” Nothing could be less true in the case of Masha Mironova, 26. All the more so since her famous father, Andrei Mironov, was also the son of renowned actors.

Yelena Morozova, actor

Yelena Morozova, actor

By Mikhail Ivanov

The non-descript coffee shop on Moscow’s Pokrovka street is a popular hangout for bohemians and young, middle-class Russians. When asked where she would be most comfortable (meaning near the window or at the rear of the café), 25-year-old Yelena Morozova answers, without missing a beat, “On Venus.?

Nikolai Repin, entrepreneur

Nikolai Repin, entrepreneur

By Mikhail Ivanov

Mathematician, internet pioneer and businessman, Nikolai Repin is a serious character. Even curt digressions into his former hobby (“sailing”) or family life (“a wife and a little daughter”) are matter-of-fact and give no cause for even a smile of pride. Life is not a joking matter to 41-year-old Nikolai Repin.

Maxim Sokolov, journalist

Maxim Sokolov, journalist

By Mikhail Ivanov

Maxim Sokolov, 41, hardly looks the part of a Russian TV journalist. The stocky, bearded writer looks more like a 19th century Russian kupets who you can picture calling out to a waiter in the traktir, “Hey, man! Bring twenty bliny! And don’t forget the salmon!

Maria Yeliseyeva, activist

Maria Yeliseyeva, activist

By Mikhail Ivanov

Maria Yeliseyeva, 36, had been working for years with children and the arts—she had an art studio attached to the local House of Pioneers, plus a puppet theater. But just over seven years ago, she happened to visit Orphanage #103 in Moscow’s Lefortovo district. 

Marina Zhgivaleva, artist

Marina Zhgivaleva, artist

By Mikhail Ivanov

Marina Zhgivaleva has been drawing since age three. When she was young, her pencils, colors and sheets of paper were her most beloved toys. She lived in a magic world all her own, one inhabited by fascinating creatures which she created in her drawings: animals, trees, plants, flowers, fruits, birds, people.

Sergei Zobnev, musician

Sergei Zobnev, musician

By Mikhail Ivanov

In early May, Sergei “Seppa” Zobnev will turn 35. And when all the members of his folk band Myllarit (“The Millers”) gather round to hoist a toast in his honor, they will surely praise his multiple roles as band director, backup vocalist, public relations manager and organizer.

 

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EVENTS FOR RUSSOPHILES

20th Annual Russian Arts and Culture Festival
May 01, 2021 to May 31, 2021

20th Annual Russian Arts and Culture Festival

Virtual | N/A, N/A

The City of West Hollywood administration invites everyone to join a virtual celebration of Russian Arts and Culture this May. An array of musical events, activities for kids, workshops, virtual tours, concerts, contests, interviews with interesting people, and much more will comprise a month-long celebration. The program of our events will be published on the website of the festival and in the Facebook group.

A Few of Our Books

The Best of Russian Life

The Best of Russian Life

We culled through 15 years of Russian Life to select readers’ and editors’ favorite stories and biographies for inclusion in a special two-volume collection. Totalling over 1100 pages, these two volumes encompass some of the best writing we have published over the last two decades, and include the most timeless stories and biographies – those that can be read again and again.
Survival Russian

Survival Russian

Survival Russian is an intensely practical guide to conversational, colloquial and culture-rich Russian. It uses humor, current events and thematically-driven essays to deepen readers’ understanding of Russian language and culture. This enlarged Second Edition of Survival Russian includes over 90 essays and illuminates over 2000 invaluable Russian phrases and words.
Woe From Wit (bilingual)

Woe From Wit (bilingual)

One of the most famous works of Russian literature, the four-act comedy in verse Woe from Wit skewers staid, nineteenth century Russian society, and it positively teems with “winged phrases” that are essential colloquialisms for students of Russian and Russian culture.
A Taste of Russia

A Taste of Russia

The definitive modern cookbook on Russian cuisine has been totally updated and redesigned in a 30th Anniversary Edition. Layering superbly researched recipes with informative essays on the dishes' rich historical and cultural context, A Taste of Russia includes over 200 recipes on everything from borshch to blini, from Salmon Coulibiac to Beef Stew with Rum, from Marinated Mushrooms to Walnut-honey Filled Pies. A Taste of Russia shows off the best that Russian cooking has to offer. Full of great quotes from Russian literature about Russian food and designed in a convenient wide format that stays open during use.
The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
The Little Golden Calf

The Little Golden Calf

Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod is a mid-sized provincial city that exists only in Russian metaphorical space. It has its roots in Gogol, and Ilf and Petrov, and is a place far from Moscow, but close to Russian hearts. It is a place of mystery and normality, of provincial innocence and Black Earth wisdom. Strange, inexplicable things happen in Stargorod. So do good things. And bad things. A lot like life everywhere, one might say. Only with a heavy dose of vodka, longing and mystery.
At the Circus

At the Circus

This wonderful novella by Alexander Kuprin tells the story of the wrestler Arbuzov and his battle against a renowned American wrestler. Rich in detail and characterization, At the Circus brims with excitement and life. You can smell the sawdust in the big top, see the vivid and colorful characters, sense the tension build as Arbuzov readies to face off against the American.
The Latchkey Murders

The Latchkey Murders

Senior Lieutenant Pavel Matyushkin is back on the case in this prequel to the popular mystery Murder at the Dacha, in which a serial killer is on the loose in Khrushchev’s Moscow...
Fish: A History of One Migration

Fish: A History of One Migration

This mesmerizing novel from one of Russia’s most important modern authors traces the life journey of a selfless Russian everywoman. In the wake of the Soviet breakup, inexorable forces drag Vera across the breadth of the Russian empire. Facing a relentless onslaught of human and social trials, she swims against the current of life, countering adversity and pain with compassion and hope, in many ways personifying Mother Russia’s torment and resilience amid the Soviet disintegration.
Murder at the Dacha

Murder at the Dacha

Senior Lieutenant Pavel Matyushkin has a problem. Several, actually. Not the least of them is the fact that a powerful Soviet boss has been murdered, and Matyushkin's surly commander has given him an unreasonably short time frame to close the case.

Popular Articles

Why Don't Russians Smile?
January 10, 2014

Why Don't Russians Smile?

By The Editors

It is a common trope that Russians never smile. Which of course is interpreted to mean they are unfriendly, gloomy, sullen – positively Dostoyevskian. This, of course, is a complete misreading of body language and cultural norms.

About Us

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