February 06, 2020

#TBT Yalta Conference



#TBT Yalta Conference

Tuesday was 75th anniversary of the start of the Yalta Conference, the first step in rebuilding the post-War world.

Stalin, Churchill, and Roosevelt (and lots of aides) convened on the (then still Russian) peninsular to talk about the course of the war and to plan for the peace.

Literary Hub this week published a superb memoir of the event. And we have published a few articles on the Yalta Conference, including this piece on a memoir we uncovered and the veracity of which we cannot confirm, but which is a rather compelling read.

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