January 11, 2022

Slavify Your Instagram Feed


Slavify Your Instagram Feed
Unfortunately, you can't follow Kandinsky himself on Instagram.  Photo by Kate Torline via Unsplash

Russian language news site Meduza recently published a list of eight of the best and most interesting contemporary Russian artists to follow on social media.

While many are familiar with some of the great works of classic Russian art, less know about the thriving 21st-century art scene. Plus, while you don’t need to know Russian to appreciate great art when you see it, seeing Russian text on your social media feed is a great way to brush up on your language skills and learn new vocabulary.

Tatiana Efrussi makes unique paintings on different mediums to reflect the theme she is working with (for example, when painting about the Coronavirus pandemic, she created a long depiction of the monotony of lockdown on a strip of wallpaper). Alina Glazoun creates really charming pieces of visual art by taking ordinary objects and images and attaching words and phrases to them.

Nadya Likhogrud’s work is much more traditional, as she creates delicate and incredibly small ceramic figurines of children and people. Artists like Ivan Simonov do the opposite and create large paintings as public art installations on the street, often as a form of social protest. 

Other artists featured in Meduza’s article are Gleb Baranov, Fedora Akimova, Dimitri Shabalin, and Elizaveta Nesterova, each providing their own artistic contributions to the internet.

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