August 07, 2020

Russia's Median Income



Russia's Median Income
There is quite a range in terms of median salaries in Russia. Image by Petar Milošević via Wikimedia Commons

Rosstat, Russia’s state statistics service, recently published information on the median level of monthly salaries for various industries in Russia. According to their data, the median monthly salary of Russians, after taxes, is almost R35,000 (approximately $480). This data is based on information gathered from May 1, 2019, to May 1, 2020.

According to the study, “This is exactly how much a typical worker in Russia officially receives on average.” Rosstat used median salary rather than average salary in their calculations, as it is a more accurate indicator of actual trends in salaries: the median salary shows the center of the “salary row,” dividing it into two equal parts, so that half of workers receive more than the median and half receive more.

In terms of salary range, 7.2% of employees make more than R100,000 ($1,370) per month, and 9.9% make less than R15,000 ($205). The highest-paid employees are in the fishing industry, with a median salary of R63,600 ($871) and 29% of employees in this industry receive more than R100,000 ($1,370) a month.

The next highest-paying field is the financial industry, with a median income of R61,500 ($842) a month and 27.3% of employees receiving more than R100,000 ($1,370) a month. On the lower end of the salary spectrum is light industry and agriculture, with median salaries of R20,500 ($280) and R24,600 ($337) a month, respectively.

Tags: workruble
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