May 13, 2021

Russian-Canadian Now 27-Year-Old Billionaire



Russian-Canadian Now 27-Year-Old Billionaire
The world's cutest crypto billionaire, Vitalik Buterin. Wikimedia Commons user Romanpoet

The founder of Ethereum, the second cryptocurrency after Bitcoin, just became the world's youngest crypto billionaire at twenty-seven. He is a Russian-born Canadian, sporting the cute name Vitalik Buterin and looking about as cute as Soviet cartoon hero Cheburashka.

Buterin does not pull in a huge salary as Ethereum founder; rather, he held onto 333,500 Ethers when he started the cryptocurrency, each of which is now worth $3,500. That is enough to put him just above the $1 billion mark as of early May 2021.

Born and raised to age six in Kolomna, Russia, Buterin attended the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, but he dropped out. He was encouraged to drop out by being awarded a Thiel Fellowship: "$100,000 to young people who want to build new things instead of sitting in a classroom." Nailed it.

The total value of what Vitalik built (all Ethers in circulation) is $403 billion as of early May.

Although Bitcoin is the more popular cryptocurrency, its founder is unknown, referred to as Satoshi Nakamoto. Thus, it is fair to say that Vitalik is the face of global cryptocurrency since Satoshi doesn't have a face.

For one of the world's most talented programmers, Buterin has a hilariously simple personal website, at https://vitalik.ca/.

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