October 28, 2020

New Kino Clip


New Kino Clip
Kino has long been a popular rock group in Russia and abroad. Screen shot from Kino's "Try to sing with me"

Fans of the rock music group Kino can now enjoy a new music video with archive materials: vocals from the group’s deceased leader Victor Tsoy. The group posted the music video for its song «Попробуй спеть вместе со мной» (“Try to sing with me”) to its YouTube channel.

The new music video contains original recordings of Tsoy’s vocals, which is accompanied by live musicians. Two former bass-guitarists from the group participated as well: Alexander Titov, who left the group in 1986, and Igor Tikhomirov, who played with the group until their breakup. The music video also contains footage from Sergei Lysenko's1986 short film «Конец каникул» (“The End of the Holidays”), which was the first time Kino participated in a film.

Fans of the group have more good news: the musicians organized a tour that will start in Minsk in February and end in Riga in June. This will be the first concert by Kino since Tsoy’s death and the group’s breakup.

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