November 10, 2020

Hot Fox Tips



Hot Fox Tips
We know he's cute, but whatever you do, don't smile at him. Jonn Leffmann, Wikimedia Commons

The Ministry of Ecology of the Moscow Region published a memo of what to do if residents encounter a fox, which, apparently, is such a common occurrence that a memo was called for.

According to the memo, it's generally smart to avoid foxes, as they're typically shy, unless they have a disease. If you do encounter one that doesn't run away, you should back away slowly, and avoid making any sudden movements.

Smiling, which Russians do a lot, when face-to-face with a fox is also a bad idea; so bad that the memo went out of its way to discuss it. Foxes, when diseased, can mistake a friendly smile for a predator baring its teeth. So keep a straight face when meeting a fox.

We didn't realize fox attacks were such a pressing issue. We would have thought bears were more Russia's style.

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