November 22, 2021

A Comfy Place for Eternal Sleep


A Comfy Place for Eternal Sleep
You know, in Japan, one of those little "pods" goes for $80 a night. P.J.L Laurens, Wikimedia Commons

Police in Krasnoyarsk region arrested a man last week for breaking into a morgue, looking for a place to sleep.

The man, in his thirties, was reportedly intoxicated and had broken into the morgue early in the morning in an attempt to sleep off the booze in a gruesome location. When doctors arrived a few hours later, they found the man and called the cops. He was arrested for breaking and entering, as well as defacing four of his slumbering neighbors with a scalpel.

While we're sure the morgue would be a quiet place to get some shut-eye, we'd be a little wary of things going bump in the night.

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