Editorial

Category Results

Boring Old Russia
May 01, 2000

Boring Old Russia

By Paul E. Richardson

After a decade marked by coup attempts, parliament sieges, wildly optimistic economic programs, cabinet reshufflings and Caucasian wars, boring is good.

The First Decade
March 01, 2000

The First Decade

By Paul E. Richardson

On March 10, 1990, in a dingy, ninth-story apartment in Moscow’s seedy northern outskirts, two grizzled American expatriates hatched a business plan.

Happy New Year?
January 01, 2000

Happy New Year?

By Paul E. Richardson

It would be fascinating—if it were not so scary—to watch how fast Russians have fallen in line to support their new prime minister, Vladimir Putin.

Of Thieves and a Gentleman
October 01, 1999

Of Thieves and a Gentleman

A lot of water has passed under the bridges over the Moskva river since our last issue of the magazine. 

What Real Men Eat
May 01, 1998

What Real Men Eat

By Paul E. Richardson

“Real men don’t eat quiche” was a popular cliché in the US during the testosterone-charged 1980s. And while it may seem passé here in the late 1990s, it certainly would have resonance in today’s Russia.

Let the Campaign Begin
April 01, 1998

Let the Campaign Begin

By Paul E. Richardson

Crowning mounting speculation about his political successor, President Boris Yeltsin recently intimated that he may throw his weight behind his daughter Tatyana Dyachenko, who currently works on the presidential team.

The Agony and the Ecstasy
February 01, 1998

The Agony and the Ecstasy

By Paul E. Richardson

At first glance, the many stories in this month’s issue might seem to have little in common. In fact, there is a common thread. Each story is about the triumph of talent and beauty amidst incredible adversity.

The Year of the Tiger
January 01, 1998

The Year of the Tiger

By Paul E. Richardson

Since this summer, Russia has been initiating a much more pragmatic, multilateral, innovative foreign policy. Long gone are the days when ideology and the politics of superpower brinksmanship set Russia’s foreign policy. 

Where the Revolution Failed
November 01, 1997

Where the Revolution Failed

By Paul E. Richardson

The 1917 Bolshevik coup d’etat is arguably the most important event of our century. As historian Richard Pipes has written, “had there not been a Russian Revolution, there would very likely have been no National Socialism; probably no Second World War and no decolonization; and certainly no Cold War, which once dominated our lives."

 

Join Our Tribe. Get a Fun Newsletter + Ridiculous Deals

EVENTS FOR RUSSOPHILES

A Few of Our Books

Driving Down Russia's Spine

Driving Down Russia's Spine

The story of the epic Spine of Russia trip, intertwining fascinating subject profiles with digressions into historical and cultural themes relevant to understanding modern Russia. 
The Spine of Russia

The Spine of Russia

This coffee table book is the photographic journal of an epic 6000-kilometer road trip. The book includes over 200 compelling images of Russians and Russian places met along the way, plus a dozen texts (in both English and Russian) on everything from business to education, from roads to fools.
The Moscow Eccentric

The Moscow Eccentric

Advance reviewers are calling this new translation "a coup" and "a remarkable achievement." This rediscovered gem of a novel by one of Russia's finest writers explores some of the thorniest issues of the early twentieth century.
The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar

The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
Moscow and Muscovites

Moscow and Muscovites

Vladimir Gilyarovsky's classic portrait of the Russian capital is one of Russians’ most beloved books. Yet it has never before been translated into English. Until now! It is a spectactular verbal pastiche: conversation, from gutter gibberish to the drawing room; oratory, from illiterates to aristocrats; prose, from boilerplate to Tolstoy; poetry, from earthy humor to Pushkin. 
22 Russian Crosswords

22 Russian Crosswords

Test your knowledge of the Russian language, Russian history and society with these 22 challenging puzzles taken from the pages of Russian Life magazine. Most all the clues are in English, but you must fill in the answers in Russian. If you get stumped, of course all the puzzles have answers printed at the back of the book.
The Little Golden Calf

The Little Golden Calf

Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
The Latchkey Murders

The Latchkey Murders

Senior Lieutenant Pavel Matyushkin is back on the case in this prequel to the popular mystery Murder at the Dacha, in which a serial killer is on the loose in Khrushchev’s Moscow...
Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod is a mid-sized provincial city that exists only in Russian metaphorical space. It has its roots in Gogol, and Ilf and Petrov, and is a place far from Moscow, but close to Russian hearts. It is a place of mystery and normality, of provincial innocence and Black Earth wisdom. Strange, inexplicable things happen in Stargorod. So do good things. And bad things. A lot like life everywhere, one might say. Only with a heavy dose of vodka, longing and mystery.

Popular Articles

Undesirable Outcome
January 01, 2022

Undesirable Outcome

By Paul E. Richardson

The history of Russia since 2008 has been to repeatedly lop off appendages – nose, ears, digits – to spite itself. Obsessed by erroneous threats, it has invaded its neighbors, quashed all democratic activity, rigged votes, interfered in foreign elections, harbored and/or enabled international cybercrime… and that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

About Us

Russian Life is a publication of a 30-year-young, award-winning publishing house that creates a bimonthly magazine, books, maps, and other products for Russophiles the world over.

Latest Posts


Our Contacts

Russian Life
PO Box 567
Montpelier VT 05601-0567

800-639-4301
802-223-4955