April 10, 2020

"Working From Home" Caught on Video



"Working From Home" Caught on Video
The film examines something that we are all becoming very familiar with. Image by Scott Akerman via Flickr

Filmmakers in Moscow recently finished shooting for their short film “Working from Home” («Удалёнка»), the first film about self-isolation during the coronavirus pandemic. Reportedly, work for the project was completed via videoconferencing. The film is the first winner in Timur Bekmambetov’s “The History of Quarantine” competition about the virtual activities of people during the pandemic.

“Working from Home” - which has yet to be released – tells the story of a work meeting via Zoom in which things don’t quite go to plan. It is shot from the point of view of someone in the video meeting. In the meeting, a boss is discussing anti-crisis measures and trying to motivate her employees, who are working from home in self-isolation and trying to attain work-life balance.

The film’s director is Aksinya Gog, who in March shot a five-hour video about the Hermitage museum on an iPhone 11 Pro Max.

Tags: video
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